RHS student council hosts miracle minute in honor of Oxford High School shooting victims

Student+Council+Vice+President+Brooklyn+Luscomb+collects+change+from+sophomore+Nilah+Haugabook+during+the+miracle+minute+for+the+Oxford+community.

Emily Miklaski

Student Council Vice President Brooklyn Luscomb collects change from sophomore Nilah Haugabook during the miracle minute for the Oxford community.

A shooting took place at Oxford High School in Oxford, Michigan on November 30; due to our proximity to the community, RHS student council decided to organize a miracle minute and moment of silence during third hour on December 7, raising over $2000.
“When it happened we really got a shock of ‘if it can happen to them, it can happen to us’ so I believe that giving back to their community is what we need to do to really support them as fellow Michiganders,” Student Council President Jake Conz said.
Conz believes that the Oxford High School tragedy put this realization into perspective for RHS because of its proximity, with the city being only forty-five minutes away from Wyandotte. This proximity also played a major role in the Student Council’s decision to help the Oxford community.
“We wanted to do something productive,” Student Council Vice President Brooklyn Luscomb said. “We felt like raising money was more helpful than just staging a walkout because those types of events don’t really benefit anyone besides the people participating.”
At the beginning of third hour, a moment of silence was taken for each of the four victims whose lives were taken in the tragedy. After that event, Student Council members, who were stationed outside of classrooms along with members from Amnesty International and Key Club members, began walking into classrooms to begin the miracle minute.
“Everyone seemed to like the idea of a miracle minute. I feel like just knowing that you’re actively doing something to help made everyone more receptive to the idea of it,” Student Council Publicist sophomore Lauren Pelland said.
To promote the miracle minute, Conz designed a graphic to share on social media which explained where the money was going and when the miracle minute would take place.
“We had a very short amount of time to promote the miracle minute so we decided social media would be the best way to get the word out to our student body,” Conz said. “I’d say it worked pretty well because we were able to raise over $2000 for the Oxford community.”
While the exact amount of money earned is still being figured because the coins raised from the miracle minute are still being counted, Student Council considers the amount raised a success. All proceeds from the miracle minute are going into a fund titled “Oxford Strong” which was created after the tragedy and is currently open for public donations.
“We decided to put it in that fund because then the community can use it for whatever they need. I know I’ve heard a lot about renaming the football field and even funeral expenses,” Conz said. “Really just whatever they decide to use it for.”
Along with struggling with time for promotion, Student Council also struggled getting approval for the event.
“We wanted the event to be done in a timely fashion, we felt like any longer than a week would be difficult for fundraising because students would not be thinking about the tragedy as much so we had about five days to promote, create a project proposal, get approval from Mr. Reynolds, and to plan the behind the scenes things like what time it should be held at and which members are going to which classrooms,” Conz said.
Despite these challenges, Student Council was able to successfully carry out the event with the help of Amnesty International and Key Club. These clubs helped collect funds throughout the actual miracle minute as the Student Council did not have enough bodies to be at every classroom within one minute.